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Thermal compound application.

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MartinW View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MartinW Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Thermal compound application.
    Posted: 08 Jan 2010 at 1:44pm
Interesting article. Note that Innovative Cooling, the makers of IC Diamond, recommend the blob method to avoid voids under the compound.
 
I wonder how many people have voids under their compound?
 
The consequences of not using the blob method can be seen in the link. Multiple air pockets.
 
 
 
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Application:

 IC Diamond is composed mostly of diamond powder (92%), and as such is quite thick. This high viscosity is by design for increased reliability and it is what makes our application procedure different.

Proper application is critical to optimum performance. Squeeze onto the center of the CPU an amount of IC Diamond compound about the size of a pea (5.0mm to 5.5mm) on the center of the CPU where most heat is concentrated. Place the heat sink on the CPU and press it down to spread IC Diamond over the CPU's surface, (Do not remove the sink to check the spread as it will introduce air into the joint). Clamp the heat sink and power up the PC.

IC Diamond has undergone considerable independent user testing to develop the easiest, simplest application procedure possible for the user. Combined with Innovation Cooling's own studies to optimize performance our application technique greatly increases the odds of having a successful user experience. It is highly recommended that you use our procedure and no others for best results

 

Proper Application Method

Figure 1 - Correct application amount

 

Figure 1-Proper Application of an approximately 5.0-5.5 mm bead on center example on left utilizing a synthetic IHS. The primary reason we recommend a compression type spreading is that we have found that the best results are attained with a compression type spreading.

The grease spreads uniformly and minimizes the introduction of air bubbles in to the thermal interface joint, a potential cause of grease failure that will affect long term reliability which can be observed in the following examples

Figure 2 - Full mount coverage

 

Figure 2-Here we have the simulated IHS clamped between two slides with 50 psi force applied with the 5.0mm-5.5mm bead application spread pattern by compression.

Simulated mount was heated heated in an oven @ 100C for 20 min to flow the compound.  Paste is smooth and  even with no visible air pockets.

 
 
 
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MartinW View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MartinW Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Jan 2010 at 1:56pm

 

Not unique to IC Diamond Figure 4 is a compression spread of a popular competition compound  to show the halo effect is not limited to IC Diamond. Demonstrated here between 2 glass slides and heated @ 125C for 1 hour clamped under pressure it shows  initial void formation.  The Slide moved a bit by accident, but the air pockets are still visible as the lighter gray spot just inboard of the outer edge.

Air pockets that were not visible in the initial application expanded under heat and pressure so the TIM Joint thickness now has an element of the mount riding on a cushion of air with the potential to affect thermal performance.

 
 

Line Application of IC Diamond. Generally single, multiple lines, multiple beads are not recommended as they have a tendency to introduce more air as the separate applications join together closing off opportunities for the air to escape.
 
 
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Soaranden View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Soaranden Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Jan 2010 at 5:02pm
At the risk of an unintended pun, this should be a "sticky."
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Magic Man View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Magic Man Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Jan 2010 at 9:40pm

I did a straight pea blob on my last but previously have also done a smaller blob first but then wiped it over with a skimmer of some kind (finger wrapped in clingfilm) to fill any voids first.

If you go back to slot 1/slot a days then you had a large CPU module to clamp against so you just sort of spread it on over that - I actually quited like that design, the CPU simply plugging in to a slot, it was neat and safe feeling rather than the clamp method now. My Athlon was the worst though since it had no cap protection and clamping a HS down on there could easily break a corner off if not level... 
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MartinW View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MartinW Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jan 2010 at 10:16am
Interesting thing is though, that companies like Arctic Silver, still recommend the two straight line technique for their product, with quad cores. And according to Innovative Coolings experiments, when the two lines merge, air is trapped between.
 
Any way, I have some Diamond now so will use their technique.
 
One things for sure though, with a £70 Noctua to play with, I won't be lapping this one. Big%20smile
 
To be honest, I can't say it made a noticeable difference last time.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote vyc66 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jan 2018 at 4:28pm
Recently I saw one very interesting thermal grease. Have you ever tried this one? I always hold in high value anything that is nano-tech or nano-material related. However in this case it is kinda overkill. Anybody has experience with these high-end materials? Is it worth it?
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MartinW View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MartinW Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jan 2018 at 1:32pm
I'm surprised to see this 8 year old thread materialise. Big smile

I've not seen the TIM you mention before no. The only diamond paste I've come across is the paste by Innovation Cooling. I don't see any figures for this pastes thermal conductivity, but interesting.

I tend to use Noctua NT-H1 these days. I used to discard it when it came with Noctua coolers but upon realising that it's a actually a very good performer it's become my go to paste.

Thing to remember though is that there's usually only a very small difference in temp between the top pastes. one or two degrees usually. Liquid Metal on the other hand is far superior to conventional paste, much closer to solder in terms of thermal conductivity.

For CPU delidding purposes though I use Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut. Best liquid metal TIM there is for delidding in my opinion. Knocked 17 degrees of my daughters 7600K and I've just used it when I delidded  my 8700K. 

Still to install and test but expecting a 15-20 degree reduction in CPU temp, compared to Intel's dodgy Die/IHS interface. 

 
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